About

 

 

For the past 17 years, I have been developing and designing original timepieces for various watch brands complementing my career and passion for designing cars over the past 35 years.  Together with my wife Amy, also a designer for the past 30 years and a Michigan native whose family is from Detroit, it has been our dream to ultimately create our own timepieces thus the Detroit Watch Company was born.

From original sketch to timeless design, the Detroit Watch Company celebrates the history of Detroit with each timepiece characterizing a time and a place in Detroit and honoring all that is enduring about the city.

Together, Amy and I have partnered to create a watch brand like no other, bringing together our passion for design, love of timepieces, and our esteem for the city of Détroit as founded by a Frenchman, Antoine de la Mothe, sieur de Cadillac.

Patrick & Amy Ayoub

From original sketch to final endorsement, the Detroit Watch Company timepieces originated in Detroit in the year 2013.  Our vision is simple—offer timeless design together with our global resources to acquire high-quality mechanical movements and hand assemble each timepiece in Detroit.

Assembly

We design every component of our watches upon selection of a specific movement and all components comprising the case, dial, hands, and crowns are original.  Sketches and technical drawings are sent directly for manufacturing to our global resources in Switzerland, Germany or Hong Kong contingent upon the project.  Upon receipt of the necessary components for our collection, the automatic movements are cased entirely by us and all components are installed and tested by us.  This process provides us complete control of our quality and manufacturing.  Because of this, our collection will always be limited to a specific quantity each year. This also enables us to create limited quantities of exclusive timepieces in the future.

 

Movement

We chose mechanical movements for their intricacy and the knowledge of the watch collector identifying with a wonderful complicated small engine at work on his or her wrist.  Hundreds of small parts, gears, springs, etc. keep a watch functioning with a slight movement of the wrist to keep it continuously wound.  Similar to all automatic movements, the watch can also be wound manually.  The rotor is what keeps an automatic watch wound. The kinetic motion of the movement of the rotor, which contains a heavy metal weight around its outer edge, winds the mainspring.  The rotor may either be wound unilaterally or bilaterally depending upon the movement model and manufacture.  A specific amount of jewels are acquired for the hardened steel pivot of a movement’s rotating gear wheels depending upon the movement caliber.  These are lodged in synthetic rubies (polished stones with a hole) and lubricated with a very thin layer of special oil.  Swiss Eta and Sellita automatic movements are used in our collections.